Toyota Canada asking 8,300 drivers to stop driving due to recall

Local CBC: A news release issued by the Canadian Armed Forces on Tuesday about their latest investigation into the 2022 Royal Military College tragedy, revealed that there was no correlation with the graduating cadets military service and that they had been off duty. Four Royal Military College cadets were found dead in Point Frederic in […]

Local

CBC: A news release issued by the Canadian Armed Forces on Tuesday about their latest investigation into the 2022 Royal Military College tragedy, revealed that there was no correlation with the graduating cadets military service and that they had been off duty.

Four Royal Military College cadets were found dead in Point Frederic in Kingston on April 29, 2022 around 2 a.m.

Foul play was ruled out immediately and it was suspected that there was dangerous use of a personal vehicle that resulted in the incident.

A military officer later confirmed the four victims had drowned. The victims were identified as Andrei Honciu, Jack Hogarth, Andrés Salek and Broden Murphy.

National

CTV: Toyota Canada issued a warning to approximately 8,300 drivers to stop driving due to a recall on airbags on the morning of Jan. 30, 2024.

Around 8,300 Toyota drivers were issued a warning about a possibility that their airbag inflators that may explode.

According to a Toyota Canada spokesperson the notice includes, “certain 2003-2004 models, including approximately 5,000 Toyota Corollas, 1,600 Toyota Corolla Matrixes and 700 RAV4s.”

“The ‘stop driving’ notice is being sent to owners of vehicles who have not, after many communication attempts, had the recall procedure done on their vehicle,” said spokesperson Phillipe Crowe in an email to CTV.

International

CTV: Former Prime Minister of Pakistan Imran Khan was sentenced to 10 years in prison for revealing state secrets.

Khan had already been serving a three year sentence prior to the event with over 150 cases that are still pending against him, ranging from contempt of court, to terrorism and inciting violence.

Known as the “Cipher Case,” Khan was convicted on Tuesday for allegedly exposing confidential documents by waving them around in a rally.

According to Khan, the documents contained proof that he was being threatened and that his ouster back in 2022 was a United States conspiracy, that was executed by the military and the Pakistani government. Both American and Pakistani officials denied his claim.

The verdict was announced in a special court inside the prison of garrison city of Rawalpindi in Pakistan where Khan was being held. Some of Khan’s legal team were denied access inside and journalists were barred from covering the event.


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