Heli-skiing crash north of Terrace, B.C., results in injuries and deaths

Local CBC: Ottawa police say they’ve done everything they can to stop the surge in vehicle thefts, but the situation shows no signs of slowing down, with five vehicles going missing every day last year. Of the 1,854 vehicles lost in 2023, Sgt. Catherine Brown said about half were recovered, “which was substantial.” Ottawa police […]

Local

CBC: Ottawa police say they’ve done everything they can to stop the surge in vehicle thefts, but the situation shows no signs of slowing down, with five vehicles going missing every day last year.

Of the 1,854 vehicles lost in 2023, Sgt. Catherine Brown said about half were recovered, “which was substantial.”

Ottawa police Chief Eric Stubbs says actions like aggressive patrols and numerous arrests aren’t enough to stem the tide of theft.

“It really grinds my gears that organized crime has found this loophole to take advantage of jurisdictional boundaries to make a lucrative game of this,” said Barrhaven West Coun. David Hill. The way to address this issue requires a concerted effort by all levels of government.

Deputy Chief Patricia Ferguson said staffing and resource mobilization are the issues we’re facing right now.

National

CTV: A helicopter carrying skiers to a remote mountain area about 50 km west of Terrace, B.C. crashed on Jan. 22 at approximately 4:15 p.m. killing three people and critically injuring four others.

Police and coroners flew to the scene of a fatal helicopter crash in northwestern B.C. on Tuesday to investigate the incident.

“It is impossible to put into words the profound grief that we feel and the sorrow that our guests and our staff share,” said John Forrest, president of Terrace-based heli-skiing operator Northern Escape Heli-Skiing, in a statement.

He said the company will work closely with police and other agencies to investigate the cause of the accident.

WorkSafeBC is also involved in the investigation, according to the RCMP.

International

Global News: French regulator CNIL said on Jan. 23 that it had fined Amazon France Logistics 32 million euros (C$48 million) for what CNIL called a ” excessively intrusive” surveillance system the company had set up to monitor employee performance.

Amazon France Logistics manages Amazon’s large warehouses in France. CNIL says Amazon set up metrics to track employee scanner idle time, and that such a system is illegal.

An Amazon spokesperson said the company disagrees with the CNIL fine and reserves the right to appeal.

“Warehouse management systems are industry standard and are necessary for ensuring the safety, quality, and efficiency of operations and to track the storage of inventory and processing of packages on time and in line with customer expectations,” he said.

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